Apr 15, 2024  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [NOTE!!!! THIS IS AN ARCHIVED CATALOG. FOR THE CURRENT CATALOG, GO TO CATALOG.NIU.EDU]

Undergraduate Courses


A complete list of undergraduate courses in alphabetical order.

 
  
  • HIST 429 - Nazi Germany


    History of National Socialism from the origins of the party to the end of World War II. Emphasis on the means used for seizing and consolidating power; social, cultural, and foreign policies of the Third Reich; anti-Semitism and the Holocaust.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 434 - The Russian Revolution


    History of Russia’s revolutionary upheavals in the early 20th century. Emphasis on the multiple and conflicting ways that participants and scholars have sought to make sense of the revolution.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 435 - Stalinism


    History of the Soviet Union under the dictatorship of Joseph Stalin, 1928-1953. Topics include rapid industrialization, collectivization, state terror, communist culture, the gulag, World War II, and the early Cold War.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 440 - Islam and Colonialism in Africa


    Islamic encounters with and resistance to European imperialism from the colonial conquest and partition of Africa to the eve of African independence.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 441 - The African Diaspora


    Major themes in the historical study of the African diaspora in the trans-Atlantic, trans-Saharan, and Indian Ocean regions. Development of African communities, cultures, ethnicities, religions, and identities under conditions of enslavement or forced migration, and processes of identification in the diaspora with the African homeland; New World developments such as creolization, the construction of multiple identities, and the positioning of enslaved Africans within the dynamics of the emergent Atlantic World. Geographic focus may vary depending on instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 442 - History of Buddhist Southeast Asia


    History of Southeast Asian countries whose rulers adopted Buddhism (Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam), as well as parts of island Southeast Asia. Colonialism, modernity, and conflict are discussed, with special attention to relationship between Buddhism and the nationalist and popular movements of the twentieth century.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 443 - History of Islamic Southeast Asia


    Historical development of Islam in Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei) and ongoing conflicts between the state and Muslim minorities in Burma, Thailand, and the Philippines.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 444 - Japanese Empire


    Rise and fall of Japan as an imperial power, ca. 1870-1945. Emphasis on strategic, economic, and ideological motivations for imperial expansion; mechanisms of formal empire in Korea, Taiwan, and Micronesia; informal empire in Manchuria, China, and Southeast Asia; Pan-Asian collaboration; and Asian nationalist resistance to Japanese rule.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 445 - The Chinese Revolution


    Intellectual and social backgrounds of the Nationalist revolutionary movement; political history of the revolutionary period to the present.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 447 - History of Burma


    History and culture of Burma from prehistoric times to the present.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 449 - History of Malaysia and Singapore


    The Malay world from prehistory to the present. Topics include early Malay trade, classical Malay culture, British imperialism, Chinese immigration, and the modern states of Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 452 - British Empire


    History of the British Empire, with a particular focus on developments from 1750 to the present. Topics include the relationship between economic change and imperial expansion and decline, gender, race, the role of violence, nationalism and decolonization.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 454 - Victorian Britain


    Cultural, political and social developments in nineteenth-century Britain. Topics include class formation, gender, religion and social norms, shifting notions of politics and the state and imperial expansion.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 456 - Ancient Mediterranean


    History of the ancient Mediterranean world to c. 700 CE. Topics include rise of agriculture, cities, and navigation; palace and temple societies, city-states, tribal groups; the formation of maritime empires, and kingdoms; and unification under the Roman Empire until its “fall.”

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 458 - Mediterranean World, 1450-1750


    History of early modern North African, European, Anatolian, and Levantine societies rimming the Mediterranean Sea.  Themes include maritime commerce, urbanization, gender relations, ethnic identities, and political developments in the Mediterranean region.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 459 - The Atlantic World, 1492-1860s


    Encounters among African, European, and Native American men and women in the Atlantic world during the early modern era. Examination of major themes in political, economic, social, and cultural history in a comparative, integrated way to provide students of African, Latin American, European, and North American history with a broader context for understanding those regions.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 461 - The American Revolution


    The causes of the Revolution and its impact on the political, economic, cultural, intellectual, and social aspects of American life.

       

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 464 - Civil War Era


    Examines the causes and consequences of the American Civil War. Topics include race and slavery in the early republic, the development of antislavery and proslavery ideologies, territorial expansion, and the history and legacy of war and Reconstruction.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 465 - Gilded Age and Progressive Era


    Examines the impact of industrialization and urbanization on vital aspects of American life and society. Topics include racial conflict, imperialism and war, the rise of organized labor, immigration, westward expansion, and social and political reform.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 466 - Corporate America: 1900-1929


    The U.S. in the era of Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Herbert Hoover. Topics include the rising corporate order, labor militance, the origins of the modern state, America’s response to war and revolution, 1920s style prosperity, and the Great Crash.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 467 - The U.S. in Depression and War, 1929-1960


    The U.S. during the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. Topics include the New Deal, social and political change in mid-century America, and the origins and meaning of the WWII and Cold War conflicts.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 468 - America Since 1960


    Analysis of social, economic, political, cultural, and intellectual trends from the Kennedy years through the post-Cold War era. Topics include the civil rights movement, the Kennedy- Johnson foreign policies toward Cuba and East Asia, the Great Society programs, the Vietnamese civil war, the “counterculture,” Nixon and Watergate, the Reagan years, and the Persian Gulf conflict and the 1990s.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 469 - The Vietnam War


    History of the American involvement in Vietnam between 1940 and 1975 that examines the evolving circumstances and policies leading to the American defeat.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 470 - America and Asia


    Relationships between Asian nations and the United States. Topics include cultural and economic exchanges, experiences of Asian immigrants and their descendants in the U.S., competing strategic aspirations and value systems, and U.S. interventions in Asian wars. Emphasis varies according to instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 471 - Workers in U.S. History, 1787-Present


    Role of workers in U.S. history from the early national period to the present. Emphasis on working class formation, labor conflict, and power relations in developing capitalist economy, how class, race and gender shaped workers’ experiences; rise and decline of labor unions; the role of law and government in limiting or expanding workers’ power.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 474 - History of Immigration and Ethnicity


    Survey of the nature and impact of immigration in American history from the colonial era to the present focusing on ethnic group origins, persistence, modification, and interaction. Includes comparative analysis of European, Latino, and Asian immigration. Examination of assimilation, acculturation, and accommodation theories, nativism, immigration legislation, multiculturalism, and minority relations.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 475 - The United States and Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent


    Focus on 20th century, including American acquisition and governance of the Philippine Islands, the American response to nationalism and independence movements, the war in Vietnam, the successive tragedies in Cambodia, and U.S.-China rivalries in the region.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 476 - American Foreign Relations to 1914


    Diplomacy of the American Revolution and the new nation, diplomatic aspects of the war with Mexico and continental expansion, and the rise of the United States as a world power in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with emphasis on imperial expansion overseas.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 477 - American Foreign Relations Since 1914


    Diplomatic aspects of the two world wars, the origins and development of the Cold War in Europe and Asia, and the American response to Third World nationalism, including the war in Vietnam.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 478 - American Legal History to 1865


    American legal development, including English backgrounds, the colonial and revolutionary eras, and the evolution of the federal constitution to 1865, with consideration of the economic, political, and intellectual factors which have contributed to its growth.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 479 - American Legal History Since 1865


    American legal development since 1865, including Reconstruction, the impact of the Industrial Revolution, and such significant 20th century constitutional issues as civil liberties, segregation, and the government’s role in the economy.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 480 - Spies, Lies and Secret Wars: CIA in the World


    Involvement of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) with various peoples, governments and events around the globe.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 481 - Indigenous Mexico


    Maya and Aztec cultures from European contact to the end of the colonial period in 1821. Focus on indigenous culture, religion, political life, conquest and resistance, disease and population decline, and changes and continuities of precolonial and colonial indigenous thought.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 482 - Mexico Since 1810


    The quest for independence–political, economic, and cultural–with attention to the revolution of 1910-1920.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 484 - History of Brazil


    Survey of Brazilian history from first encounters between Europeans and Americans to the present; evolution of Brazil’s politics, economy, society, and culture.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 486 - Inequality in Latin America


    Exploration of the persistent gap between rich and poor in Latin America and the poverty of Latin America relative to the developed world. Inquiry into the challenges faced by Latin American countries in addressing poverty and inequality, including the legacy of colonialism, opportunities and limitations of the 19th century export booms, industrialization and urbanization in the 20th century, and distribution of burdens and benefits in Latin American society, polity, and economy.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 487 - The Latin American City


    Urbanization and urban life in Latin America from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on rapid rural-to-urban migration in the twentieth century and the rise of mega-cities.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 491 - Special Topics in History


    A. Ancient
    B. Medieval
    C. Early Modern European (including British)
    D. Modern European (including British)
    E. Russian and Eastern European
    G. African
    J. Asian
    M. United States
    N. Latin American
    R. General/Comparative
    U. Global

    Selected themes or problems. Topics announced. May be repeated when subject varies.

    Credits: 3

  
  • HIST 492 - Introduction to Public History


    Introduction to the practical application of historical knowledge in such areas as historic preservation, manuscript and archival management, editing, genealogy and family history, oral history, and museum work.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 493 - Independent Study


    Independent research for qualified students. Consent of the faculty member with whom the student wishes to study is necessary. May count toward appropriate field requirement in the History major, depending on topic. May not be repeated.

    Credits: 1-4
  
  • HIST 494 - Oral History


    Introduction to the theory and practice of interviewing as a way of creating, documenting, and interpreting historical evidence. Attention given to systematic analysis and the practice of editing, indexing, recording, preserving, and transcribing tapes and to the application of oral history to historical research and writing.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HIST 495 - Senior Thesis


    Capstone of the history major, involving advanced practice in the craft of the professional historian. All sections of course organized as seminars, and participants engage primarily in writing and presenting a paper based on their own research. Extensive library/ archival work. In addition, each student meets with his or her research adviser.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: History major, senior standing, HIST 395, successful completion of at least one 400-level NIU history course (excluding HIST 400 and HIST 496), and consent of department.

    Credits: 4
  
  • HIST 496 - History and Social Science Instruction for Secondary Educators


    Crosslisted as ANTH 496X, ECON 496X, GEOG 496X, POLS 496X, PSYC 496X, and SOCI 496X. Organization and presentation of materials for history and social science courses at the secondary levels.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Admission to the history or social science secondary educator licensure program and permission of the Department of History’s office of secondary educator licensure.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HLTH 473 - Topics in Health Studies


    Examination of contemporary issues and problems in medical laboratory sciences, nutrition, public health and health education. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HLTH 494 - Independent Study in Health Studies


    Independent study under direction of a faculty member in the medical laboratory sciences, nutrition, public health, and health education programs. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours when subject varies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HLTH 498 - Seminar in Health Studies


    Professional career development, opportunities for employment, organization affiliations, and legislation as it affects the programs in the School of Health Studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school. 

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HLTH 499 - Honors Capstone Project


    Intensive study of a selected topic in health studies involving experimental or other scholarly work that serves as the capstone project in the University Honors Program. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 202 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry


    Exploration of related fields and career opportunities in the hospitality industry, travel and tourism, lodging, foodservice, meetings and conventions, leisure and recreation, and beverage operations. Description of specific positions including requirements of job duties, skills, knowledge, personality attributes, and working conditions. Overview of current regional, national, and global trends in the industry.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 296 - Cooperative Education I for Hospitality Management


    Cooperative work experience for students in the hospitality management emphasis in family and consumer sciences. Participation and work site must be approved by the school and the cooperative education program coordinator. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Declared hospitality management major.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HOSP 299 - Experiences in Hospitality Management I


    Approved introductory experiences and related training programs supervised by a professional specialist. When credit is earned in conjunction with HOSP 399, Experiences in Hospitality Management II, total credit hours in both courses may not exceed 30 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school.

    Credits: 3-30
  
  • HOSP 302 - Lodging Operations


    Study of operational issues of lodging facilities including housekeeping, reservations, and front desk. Focus on revenue management, forecasting, and property management systems. On-site observations with practical applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202 with a grade of C or better.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 303 - Hospitality Law


    Introduction to the principles of hotel, restaurant, and travel law. Case studies of industry related regulations on duty of innkeepers, dram shop laws, truth in menu laws, and service contracts in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: MGMT 217 and HOSP 202. CRQ: HOSP 302.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 304 - Food and Beverage Operations


    Principles of food and beverage operations. Application of established standards, techniques, and practices of food and beverage management including styles of dining room services, menu design, purchasing, storing, and controlling restaurant supplies and equipment, legal issues on serving alcoholic beverages, food sanitation, revenue and cost control, restaurant facility design, customer service, and labor management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 314 - Hospitality Facility Management


    An overview of the operation of hospitality facilities, including operating costs for various types of facilities, types and characteristics of major building systems, renovation and design issues specifically related to the hospitality industry. Environmentally sustainable hotel management is discussed with a broad range of topics including global certifications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 302. CRQ: MGMT 333.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 315 - Casino and Gaming Management


    Emphasis on the structure and operating protocols for gaming, including onshore and offshore venues. Focus on internal/external auditing, gaming regulations, economic impact, e-commerce, financial control, and responsible gaming.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 316 - Hospitality Service


    Principles and practices of service excellence within the hospitality industry. Presents an overview of service management in the hospitality industry including design, evaluation, and management of hospitality service delivery systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202 and hospitality management major.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 319 - Foundations of Tourism


    Introduction to the principles, practices, and philosophies of tourism, with emphasis upon global impacts, delivery and development of products and services, tourist behavior, and economic aspects of the tourism industry. Examines travel and tourism from an interdisciplinary perspective.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Sophomore standing.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 320 - Quantity Food Production


    Application of principles of food preparation to quantity food production and service, including operation and care of equipment, procurement of goods, scheduling of employees, costing of menus, and management responsibilities for a day of service in a student-operated dining facility.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: NUTR 200A with a grade of C or better and NUTR 200B with a grade of C or better, or HOSP 316 with a grade of C or better, Illinois Food Service-Sanitation manager Certification, first aid and cardiac pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certifications, 2-step tuberculin (TB) test, and verification of 60 hours work experience in food production. 

    Credits: 4
  
  • HOSP 396 - Cooperative Education II for Hospitality Management


    Advanced cooperative work experience for students in the hospitality management emphasis in family and consumer sciences. Participation and work site must be approved by the school and the cooperative education program coordinator. Enrollment is restricted to students participating in a second course experience or equivalent. S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 296 or equivalent, declared hospitality management major, and consent of school.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HOSP 399 - Experiences in Hospitality Management II


    Approved advanced experiences and related training programs supervised by a professional specialist. When credit is earned in conjunction with HOSP 299, Experiences in Hospitality Management I, total credit hours in both courses may not exceed 30 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school.

    Credits: 3-30
  
  • HOSP 411 - Yield Management in the Hospitality Industry


    Exploration of competitive benchmarking, demand forecasting and distribution using case analysis, internal and external measurement tools, tactical pricing and packaging in the hospitality operation. Topics include demand forecasting in hospitality operation, channel and hotel room inventory management, and yield management software application.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 302 and ECON 260.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 413 - Meeting, Event, and Convention Management


    Fundamental concepts of meeting, event, and convention management. Includes the foundation and structure of the meeting industry, site selection, facility contractual issues, meeting budget management, industry associations, Convention and Visitors Bureaus, meeting destinations, sponsors, meeting technology, convention and conference centers, and catering management. Career exploration is also discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202 with a grade of C or better.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 417 - Trade Show and Exhibition Management


    Study of trade show and exhibition management. Includes varieties of exhibitions, trade show planning, on-site operations, design of exhibitor prospectus, marketing materials, floor plans, legal considerations, registration and data management, specification and work orders, service contractors, housing management, and international exhibitions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 413 with a grade of C or better, and at least junior standing.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 418 - Managing Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry


    Fundamental concepts, techniques, and tools of human resources management in the hospitality industry. Includes legislative and technical aspects of managing hospitality employees, roles and responsibilities of hospitality managers in employee selection, performance appraisals, training, compensation, and benefits. Global issues and other current topics in hospitality human resource management are covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 202 with a grade of C or better and MGMT 333.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 425 - Hospitality Management


    Application of cost control principles to hospitality industry with focus on financial statement analysis, management of assets, ratio analysis, operating budgeting, and cash management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ACCY 206 or ACCY 288; and MATH 110 or satisfactory performance on the mathematics placement examination.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 426 - Strategic Management in the Hospitality Industry


    Analysis of environments associated with a product/market domain and implementation of the proper mix of competitive strategy and organization structure in the hospitality industry. Opportunity to explore the process and content of strategic management as applied to the administration of hospitality organizations. Attention is given to specific strategies for building competitive advantage and generating superior value for customers in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 425 with a grade of C or better, and MGMT 333.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 427 - Catering Operations Practicum


    Study and application of catering functions and services. Plan, organize, implement and execute catering activities at the Chandelier Dining Room and other locations. Laboratory to be announced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Illinois Food Service Sanitation Manager Certification Certificate.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 430 - Data Analysis for the Hospitality Industry


    Acquaint students with a variety of data, including the hotel industry performance reports and restaurant industry operations report, that can be turned into useful information for sound hospitality decision making.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 425; and MATH 210 or MATH 211.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HOSP 491 - Leadership Seminar in Hospitality and Tourism


    Address key characteristics and practices of hospitality leaders and leadership skills required to develop high-performance teams and employee empowerment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 418.

    Credits: 2
  
  • HOSP 492 - Distinguished Speaker Series


    Industry leaders representing the hospitality and tourism industries are invited to speak on their vision and the challenges that they face. May be repeated up to a maximum of two semester hours when subjects vary.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of school.

    Credits: 1
  
  • HOSP 495 - Internship in Hospitality Management


    Supervised participation in professional settings. Includes experiences appropriate to professional interests in the hospitality industry. May be repeated up to a maximum of 15 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: HOSP 302 or HOSP 304; HOSP 316, and FACS 498; with a grade of C or better in each course. 

    Credits: 1-15
  
  • HSCI 217 - Academic Success and Career Development in Health and Human Sciences


    Identification of student academic strengths, skills, and interests in the exploration of and career planning for various health service occupations. Focus on preparation for entry into specialized training programs or health service positions. May be repeated to a maximum of 3 semester hours. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Health science majors or consent of school. 

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • HSCI 310 - Introduction to Health and Human Sciences


    Interdisciplinary overview of health and human sciences including individual, family, and community health and well-being; health and human sciences organizations; professional practice; and the life course model.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHHS major with at least junior standing or Gerontology minor or consent of school. 

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 318 - Medical Terminology


    Study of the basic language related to medical science and to the allied health professions incorporating anatomy and physiology and pathophysiology. Emphasis on word analysis using case studies and medical reports.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 350 - Critical Thinking for Health and Human Services Professionals


    Crosslisted as NURS 349X. Development of critical thinking skills as applied to health and human services professionals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Admission to an academic program in the College of Health and Human Sciences.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 410 - Legal and Ethical Issues for Health and Human Sciences Professionals


    Evaluation of complex legal and ethical issues in health and human sciences service delivery. Application of professional codes of ethics to clarify appropriate responses to contemporary dilemmas in the health and human sciences. Development of critical thinking about ethical issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHHS major with at least junior standing; or consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 430 - Working with Diverse Populations in Health and Human Sciences


    Examination of relationships among culture, health, and well-being. Investigation of historical, cultural, social, economic, political, and environmental factors that impact health behavior and health status of diverse groups.  Exploration of strategies for culturally and linguistically appropriate service delivery addressing the needs of diverse populations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHHS major with at least junior standing; or consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 450 - Administration for Professionals in Health and Human Sciences


    Administrative principles as they pertain to provision of services by professionals working in health and human sciences settings. Topics include departmental supervision, personnel issues, resource management, safety issues, and governmental regulations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHHS majors with at least junior standing; or consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 455 - Management of Financial Resources in Health and Human Sciences Organizations


    Survey of accounting and finance techniques used by department-level health and human sciences managers. Emphasis on third-party reimbursement mechanisms, the regulatory environment, interpreting financial accounting statements, and applying managerial accounting techniques. Topics include cost behavior analysis, budgeting, planning, financial ratios, cost-volume-profit analysis, discounted cash-flow analysis and related applications of accounting and finance in health and human sciences organizations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHHS major with at least junior standing; or consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 460 - Research in Health and Human Sciences


    An introductory course in the research process for students in health and human sciences. General concepts of research and evidence-based practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ:  STAT 208 or STAT 301 or UBUS 223; and CHHS major with at least junior standing; or consent of school.

    Credits: 3
  
  • HSCI 490 - Capstone in Health Sciences


    Analysis of academic learning experiences related to a defined area of study and tied to career goals. Integration of the perspectives of a practitioner and application to a case scenario in a defined professional setting. Reflection of initial educational goals and plans for professional development recommended to be taken in the final semester prior to graduation. S/U grading may be used. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Health sciences major or consent of school. 

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • IDSP 225 - Introduction to Medieval Society and Culture


    Interdisciplinary orientation and introduction to medieval studies including study of different cultural forms (literature, music, art, philosophy, science, and religion) and the “way of life” of different strata of society.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IDSP 290 - Drama Into Film


    Consideration of selected classics of drama which have been filmed from the literary, theatrical, and cinematic approaches. Team-taught by members of the English, communication, and theatre and dance faculty through lectures, discussion, and film showings.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IDSP 291 - Art and Literature in the Ancient World


    The interrelationships between the study of art history and literature as the two disciplines, through their complementary methods of approach, introduce and clarify the cultural backgrounds of the Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Hebrew, and Greco-Roman civilizations.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IDSP 301 - Study Abroad Programs


    Course work undertaken as part of an approved university study abroad program. May be counted toward the satisfaction of general education requirements if approved as the equivalent of an authorized general education course. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours.

    Credits: 1-9
  
  • IDSP 401 - Study Abroad Programs


    Course work undertaken as part of an approved university study abroad program. May be counted toward the satisfaction of general education requirements if approved as the equivalent of an authorized general education course. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours.

    Credits: 1-9
  
  • IDSP 425 - Seminar in Medieval Studies


    Interdisciplinary seminar for undergraduates which is required for the medieval studies concentration and open to other qualified students with the permission of the instructor. The course will focus on a selected theme or period in medieval civilization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of coordinator.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IDSP 441 - Environmental Management Systems


    How to plan and implement environmental management systems in a variety of settings to prevent environmental pollution and other environmental problems. Interdisciplinary perspectives used to discuss environmental management systems for companies, communities, and governmental agencies, with emphasis on student group projects, case studies, and Internet applications. Instruction by faculty from the Colleges of Business, Engineering and Engineering Technology, and Liberal Arts and Sciences, along with guest speakers.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IDSP 442 - Proseminar/Internship in Environmental Management Systems


    Application of concepts of environmental management systems to real-world settings through an internship or other applied learning experience. Internship partners may be a company, community, or governmental agency; or students may elect to pursue a project with a faculty adviser. Includes group meetings to discuss students’ on-going projects and to relate these to core readings. Written case study of internship or project required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: IDSP 441.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IEET 450 - Patent and Copyright Law for Engineers and Scientists


    Fundamentals of intellectual property rights as applied to engineering and science. Discussion of the basis of those rights in patent, copyright, trade secret, and trademark laws. Focus on patent searches, patent claim review, and patent application drafting. Exposure to the knowledge base required for a career as a patent agent or patent lawyer. Use of case studies to learn to manage intellectual property strategically and to develop the analytical skills necessary for engineers and scientists to protect innovative ideas and inventions. Review of employment contracts with a focus on ownership of inventions, confidentiality, non-competition provisions, and the associated consequences for engineers and scientists.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IEET 490 - Topics in Engineering and Engineering Technology


    Selected interdisciplinary topics from various engineering or engineering technology disciplines not offered in regular departmental courses. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  • IEET 491 - Integrated Systems Engineering I


    Introduction to the fundamental principles of integrated systems engineering and their application to the development of integrated systems. Topics include integrated systems engineering principles, integrated systems engineering processes and methodologies, integration of the necessary technical disciplines and integrated systems engineering project management. Students may not enroll in IEET 591 for credit towards the degree unless they are enrolled in the BS-MS program.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of college.

    Credits: 3
  
  • IEET 492 - Integrated Systems Engineering II


    Advanced integrated systems engineering and related applications, with focus on integrated systems engineering of complex systems, products and services; application of principles in integrated systems engineering processes and methodologies; incorporating concepts such as integrated systems reliability management, maintenance, safety, security and cost optimization. Students may not enroll in IEET 592 for credit towards the degree unless they are enrolled in the BS-MS program.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: IEET 491 or consent of college.

    Credits: 3
  
  • ILAS 100 - Introduction to Latin American Civilization


    Introduction to Latin American civilization with consideration of anthropology, archaeology, art, history, literature, music, politics, international relations, and linkages with Latinos in the United States.

    Credits: 3
  
  • ILAS 101 - Preceptorial


    Designed to provide new students with an understanding of the ways in which the three divisions of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (humanities, social sciences, and sciences) address questions of personal identity and the value of the collegiate experience.

    Credits: 1
  
  • ILAS 123 - Cultural Pluralism in the United States


    Introduction to the multicultural background of American civilization which assists students in gaining a greater understanding of the cultural differences within a plural society. Analysis of the adaptation experiences of cultural groups in the United States and examination of their goals, aspirations, problems, and achievements.

    Credits: 3
  
  • ILAS 170 - World Religions


    Survey of the major religions of the world. Consideration of such religions as Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, and Hinduism in the light of their own religious writings as well as critical and comparative examinations of their meaning and significance.

    Credits: 3
  
  • ILAS 201 - Introductory Clinical Experience


    Discipline-related early clinical experiences for prospective secondary school teachers. Designed to provide an overview of teaching as a profession and of contemporary issues in public schools. Includes a minimum of 30 clock hours of supervised and formally evaluated participation in a variety of settings within the placement schools, and seminars on relevant topics. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of discipline department.

    Credits: 1
  
  • ILAS 250 - External Education


    Credit for approved apprenticeships and related training programs supervised by professional specialists. A maximum of 30 semester hours may be accumulated if approved. Applications for credit must be made in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences office.

    Credits: 3-30
  
  • ILAS 261 - Language, Mind, and Thought


    Functioning of the human mind from the perspectives of anthropology, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology. Interdisciplinary consideration of perception, language, reasoning, artificial intelligence, culture, and models of cognition.

    Credits: 3
 

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