Feb 01, 2023  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [NOTE!!!! THIS IS AN ARCHIVED CATALOG. FOR THE CURRENT CATALOG, GO TO CATALOG.NIU.EDU]

Undergraduate Courses


A complete list of undergraduate courses in alphabetical order.

 
  
  •  

    ENGL 476 - British Drama Since 1900


    Includes works by such representative playwrights as Wilde, Shaw, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Stoppard, and Churchill.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 477 - Postcolonial and New Literatures in English


    Representative works of new literatures in English by postcolonial South Asian, African, Australian, and Caribbean writers, such as Arundhati Roy, Buchi Emecheta, Ben Okri, Peter Carey, Michelle Cliff, and Derek Walcott.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 479 - Theory and Research in Literature for English Language Arts


    Theory and research applied to principled practices in teaching the reading of complex texts, including canonical, multicultural, young adult, and informational literature in English Language Arts. Aligned with the Common Core Standards, the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, and the National Council of Teachers of English standards for teaching English Language Arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 404, 9 semester hours of literature at the 300 and 400 level, or consent of department. CRQ: ILAS 301.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 480 - Materials and Methods of Teaching English Language Arts


    A. At the Secondary Level. Methods, curriculum materials, and technologies essential to the teacher of English Language Arts. Emphasis on designing coherent and integrated units of instruction, including the strategic use of assessments to foster learning. Developing a variety of activities and multiple representations of concepts to accommodate diverse students’ characteristics and abilities, especially for learners at the high level (9-12). Aligned with the Common Core Standards, the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, and the National Council of Teachers of English standards for teaching English Language Arts.

    B. At the Middle Level. Methods, curriculum materials, and technologies essential to the teacher of English Methods, curriculum materials, and technologies essential to the teacher of English Language Arts. Emphasis on designing coherent and integrated units of instruction, including the strategic use of assessments to foster learning. Developing a variety of instructional activities and multiple representations of concepts to accommodate diverse students’ characteristics and abilities, especially for learners at the middle school level (grades 5-8). Aligned with the Common Core Standards, the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards, and the National Council of Teachers of English standards for teaching English Language Arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    For A: PRQ: ENGL 479 or consent of department. CRQ: ENGL 482.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ENGL 482 - Clinical Experience in English Language Arts


    Discipline-based clinical experience for students seeking educator licensure in English Language Arts. Practicum in teaching methods, assessment, problem solving, and on-site research. Minimum of 50 clock hours of supervised and formally evaluated experiences in the setting likely for student teaching.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department. CRQ: ENGL 480.

    Credits: 1-2
  
  •  

    ENGL 483 - Renaissance Literature


    Comparative study of works, read in translation, by such continental figures as Petrarch, Erasmus, Machiavelli, Marguerite de Navarre, Rabelais, and Cervantes.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 485 - Student Teaching in Secondary English Language Arts


    Student teaching for one semester. Assignments arranged through the office of clinical experiences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, in consultation with the coordinator of educator licensure in English Language Arts. Ongoing assessment of candidate’s development. Candidates must satisfactorily complete a formal teacher performance assessment. Monthly on-campus seminars. Not available for credit in the major. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ENGL 480, ENGL 482, and consent of department.

    Credits: 7-12
  
  •  

    ENGL 489 - European Novel


    Selected works since 1700, read in translation, by such novelists as Goethe, Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Kafka, Duras, and Calvino. Organization may be thematic or chronological.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 490 - Senior Seminar in English Studies


    A. Literature
    B. Linguistics
    C. Rhetoric
    D. Creative Writing
    E. English Pedagogy

    Intensive study of selected topics within one area in English studies. Directed study to prepare a seminar project for presentation to the seminar participants. Topics announced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Senior standing.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ENGL 491 - Honors Directed Study


    Directed study in an area of English studies. Open to all department honors students. May be repeated once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 493 - Writing Creative Nonfiction II


    Advanced workshop in writing creative nonfiction. The writing of personal and autobiographical essays with attention paid to extensive revision, formal and thematic experimentation, and considerations about the implications of the self as author and subject. Continues and advances the work begun in Writing Creative Nonfiction.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ENGL 303.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENGL 494 - Writing Center Practicum


    Crosslisted as ILAS 494X. Theoretical and practical instruction in tutoring, required for all undergraduate writing consultants in the University Writing Center. Includes research on cross-curricular writing tasks in a supervised, on-the-job situation. S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 3 semester hours with consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENGL 495 - Practicum in English


    Practical writing and other professional experience in supervised on-the-job situations. May be repeated to a maximum of 3 semester hours. S/U grading.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENGL 496 - Internship in Writing, Editing, or Training


    Involves primarily writing, editing, or training in business, industry, or government setting, and that is jointly supervised by the English department’s internship coordinator and an individual from the sponsoring company or organization. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours. Up to 3 semester hours may be applied toward the English department’s program requirements. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Prior approval by the Department of English, a minimum of 120 contact hours, and other requirements as specified by the department.

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    ENGL 497 - Directed Study


    Directed study in any area of English studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENGL 498 - Topics in English Studies


    Exploration of a topic or theme in English studies via lectures, discussions, and reports. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours when topic varies.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENGL 499 - Topics in English Literature


    Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours when topic varies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 100 - Exploring the Environmental Studies Major


    Discussion of different emphasis and career options. Includes advising.  Internships and research opportunities on campus will be explored. Guest lectures by faculty. Library and literature research skills. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Declared major in environmental studies.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ENVS 210 - Introduction to Sustainable Food Systems


    Overview of how Illinois residents have responded to food problems through local initiatives. Examines different local food models used in DeKalb County and northern Illinois. Local public gardens will be used to explore soil science, food justice, local food, project management, public health, and environmental issues. Opportunities for several on-site visits to food production operations in the region. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work in local public gardens per week.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 301 - Environmental Science I: Physical Systems


    Physical scientific foundations to facilitate understanding of current environmental issues. Spatially, material includes local, regional, and global scale processes. Temporally, provides context for current environmental changes by supplying an understanding of the Earth’s environment in geologic time. Topics covered are primarily those that relate to environmental processes that have been most subject to human manipulation over the past millennia. Includes at least two Saturday field trips.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 302 - Environmental Science II: Biological Systems


    Introduction to the biological component of environmental science, focusing on understanding the functioning of ecosystems, the patterns of biological diversity, the processes that influence those patterns over space and time, and how human activities can disrupt those processes. At least two Saturday field trips are required.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 303 - Environment in the Social Sciences and Humanities


    Focus on human interaction with, and representation of, the environment with particular attention to how human communities and political institutions respond to and serve as agents of environmental change. Divided into three basic components intended to provide an understanding of trends in prehistoric and historic human adaptation, contemporary environmental challenges linked to industrialization, and the ways in which contemporary human communities and political institutions respond to and contest environmental challenges within the context of complex state and global changes.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ENVS 304 - Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics


    Overview of how American society has responded to environmental problems through law and policy. Examination of the public policy debates that have animated the environmental movement in general, and environmental law in particular, including risk assessment and risk management. Includes an overview of environmental law, including the regulatory process, judicial review, and a brief examination of basic environmental statutes. Introduction to an economic analysis of environmental problems and proposed market-based solutions.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 305X - Green Technologies


    Crosslisted as TECH 305. Introduction to environmentally friendly engineering and technological advances and new technologies that utilize green principles and green transportation. Includes topics in new areas of green manufacturing and materials used today and planned for the future, including the operation and manufacture of solar cells and the production of wind, thermal, and hydroelectric power. Topics will vary depending upon new trends in industry. Several on-site visits to green industries in the region.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: MATH 155 with a C or better or MATH 211 or MATH 229 or MATH 230; and CHEM 100 or CHEM 110 or CHEM 210.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 315 - Geography of Energy


    Crosslisted with GEOG 315X. Interdisciplinary overview of the geography of energy. Basics of energy literacy, including unit conversions and net energy analysis. Geographic components of current energy production, consumption and transportation, including fossil fuels and renewable energy resources. Major geographic, energetic, environmental and/or economic issues related to the continued production of energy. Comparison and contrast of energy options from a net energy perspective.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 343X - Extinction: Where the Wild Things Were


    Crosslisted as ANTH 343. Examination of the processes of natural selection, genetic drift, the formation of new species, and extinction. Review of natural extinction events due to environmental change as well as human-induced extinctions of prehistoric, historic and modern species.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 391X - Domesticating the Planet


    Crosslisted as ANTH 391. Examines the critical problems of human interactions with their environment, such as climate change, resource intensification and depletion, resource conflict, disasters, and demographic impacts on the environment using a conceptual background in human ecology and cultural evolution.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Departmental or University Honors Student.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 400 - Careers in Environmental Studies


    Exploration of career options for environmental studies majors based on emphasis. Assists students with the identification of career paths, the development of skills (e.g., resume creation, interviewing techniques, adopting professional attitudes and behavior), and provides coaching and mentoring opportunities. Graduate school and other non-traditional options will be explored. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Environmental studies major and junior or senior standing.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ENVS 401 - Third Clinical High School Experience in Environmental Science


    Discipline-based early clinical experience for students seeking teacher licensure in environmental science. Observations, evaluation, methods, and problems practicum in subject discipline teaching. Includes a minimum of 40 clock hours of supervised and formally evaluated experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    ENVS 409 - Water Quality


    Crosslisted as BIOS 409X, GEOL 409X, and PHHE 409X. Survey of microbiological and chemical parameters affecting water quality and their associated public health aspects. Topics include microbial detection methods, waterborne disease, organic and inorganic parameters, drinking water, wastewater treatment plants, source water, and risk assessment. Lectures, laboratories, and a field trip.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: CHEM 110 and CHEM 111 or consent of the department.

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    ENVS 410 - Fire and Pesticide Certification


    Introduction and foundations of wildland fire behavior, firefighting, and pesticide application. Online training and field exercises leading to National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) firefighter type 2 certification in conjunction with NWCG-certified course administrator. Preparation for Illinois Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator competency examination. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRQ: ENVS 302 or BIOS 406.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    ENVS 420X - Waterworlds


    Crosslisted as ANTH 420. Exploration of water as a resource under threat and as a window into social worlds. Using crosscultural case studies, concentrates on customs, tools, and ideologies for encountering, appreciating, and controlling water as well as solutions to water scarcity, pollution, and unjust distribution. Seminar-style includes interdisciplinary readings, films, and field trip(s).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 421X - Introduction to Green Engineering


    Crosslisted as ISYE 421. Basic principles of green engineering, impact of engineering activities on the global environment and ways to minimize the impact through better selection of materials, design of products and processes, distribution and reuse of products, and management of life cycles, etc. Life cycle analysis concepts and their applications to product and process life cycles. Environmental ethics and environmental auditing, including ISO environmental standards.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of the department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 425X - Environment and Anthropology


    Crosslisted as ANTH 425. Human adaptation to the natural environment, including interconnections between ideologies, social systems, economics, political structures, and ecology. Historical development of environmental studies in anthropology, particularly ecological anthropology, up through and including the emergence of political ecology and environmental anthropology. Topics include ecological adaptation of non-industrial societies, communal resources, world food and population, industrial food systems, contemporary environmentalism, and the relationship between science, policy and the state.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ANTH 220 or consent of the department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 427X - Environmental Chemistry


    Crosslisted as CHEM 427. Exploration of atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, and water pollution, with particular emphasis on the impact of organic compounds in the environment. Three hours of lecture/week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: GEOG 101 or GEOL 105 or ENVS 301, and CHEM 211 and 213, or consent of the department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 432X - Nature and the Environment across Cultures


    Crosslisted as ANTH 432. Investigation of the different ways people conceptualize nature and the environment across cultures. Focus on out-of-awareness cultural models, that is, intermediary mental organizations of meaning that stand between universal concepts and culturally bound realizations. Critical evaluation of a number of projects that attempt to use local and/or indigenous knowledge in managing the relationship between people, nature, and the environment is included.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 435X - Gender and the Environment


    Crosslisted as WGST 435. Topics and issues pertaining to gender and the environment such as the role of gender and other social factors in perceptions, knowledge, and behaviors regarding the environment today and in the past; women’s contributions to environmental arts and sciences; the role of gender in environmental activism and policy in the U.S. and around the globe.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 444X - Primate Ecology and Conservation


    Crosslisted as ANTH 444. Study of living nonhuman primates with an understanding of how primates have adapted to their environment and how this information is essential for conservation planning. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ANTH 240 or consent of department.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 450 - Issues in Environmental Studies


    Interdisciplinary approaches and perspectives on selected issues in environmental studies. Independent study and seminars. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 3-6
  
  •  

    ENVS 471X - Ancient Environments and Human Technology


    Crosslisted as ANTH 471. In-depth anthropological perspective on ancient human interaction with the environment, with emphasis on the role the environment plays in cultural change. Experience in the synchronization of environmental and archaeological research and understanding how ancient societies manipulated their environments to foster ecological change.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 475X - Science across Time and Culture


    Crosslisted as BIOS 484X, CHEM 490X, GEOL 475, and PHYS 490X. Examination of major concepts of science and how they evolved. Comparison and contrast of the role and practice of science in various cultures and examination of the interaction between science, technology, and culture. This course is only available to educator licensure candidates.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: GEOL 120 and GEOL 121, or consent of department.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    ENVS 481 - Field Research in Political Ecology


    In-depth expertise in theory and methods of the interdisciplinary field of political ecology. Includes intensive introduction to political ecology theory, followed by a mentored political ecology research project with a faculty member. Concurrent workshop gatherings for lessons and discussion of methodological issues confronted in research projects. Course work in ethnographic and/or quantitative research methodologies or demonstration of equivalent research experience expected prior to enrollment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ANTH 460 or consent of department.

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    ENVS 482 - Transition to the Professional Environmental Science Teacher


    A transitioning experience, in which the educator licensure candidate achieves closure on the initial phase of professional preparation and, upon that foundation, charts a path for continuing professional growth as a practicing teacher. Reflection on the preparatory experience and completion of documentation demonstrating ability to perform as a qualified environmental science teacher. Such documentation will include, but not be limited to, the electronic portfolio, a professional development plan, and a resume.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRQ: ENVS 487 or consent of the department.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    ENVS 483X - Interdisciplinary Teaching of Science in Secondary Education


    Crosslisted as BIOS 402X, CHEM 493X, GEOL 483, and PHYS 493X. Methods and theory for the teaching of interdisciplinary science in grades 6-12. Exploration of the nature and purpose of science and its underlying assumptions, the social and cultural challenges in science teaching, and the potential solutions to these challenges through research, discussion, and reflection. Use of state and national science standards to develop student learning objectives and to design inquiry-based lesson plans, microteaching, construction and use of assessment rubrics, and ongoing development of a professional portfolio.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 487 - Student Teaching (Secondary) in Environmental Science


    Assignments made by Environmental Studies. Also see “Emphasis 7, Educator Licensure” for other regulations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: ENVS 495X and consent of department.

    Credits: 10
  
  •  

    ENVS 490 - Undergraduate Research


    Independent work in environmental studies under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENVS 491 - Special Topics in Environmental Studies


    Lectures, discussion, readings, and reports on topics of special interest in a particular field of environmental studies. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of the department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENVS 492 - Internship in Environmental Studies


    Work for a semester or a summer as interns with appropriate organizations under the supervision and advisement of a faculty adviser. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Credits: 1-6
  
  •  

    ENVS 495 - Methods in Teaching Environmental Sciences


    Methods and materials and theory for teaching secondary environmental science. Emphasis on goal-setting, and planning logically sequenced learning experiences that are multisensory, interactive and that include opportunity for evaluation of on-going learning. Discussion and microteaching. Does not count as credit for the undergraduate major in environmental sciences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRQ: ENVS 401.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ENVS 498 - Senior Thesis


    Independent research on an environmental studies problem under the direction of a faculty adviser leading to the completion of a written report and oral presentation to a thesis committee. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of the department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ENVS 499 - Senior Thesis: Honors


    Independent research for honors students on an environmental studies problem under the direction of a faculty adviser leading to the completion of a written report and oral presentation to a thesis committee. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of the department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPFE 201 - Education as an Agent for Change


    Study of the complex problems facing educational and other institutions in our multicultural or pluralistic communities and the role of education as an agent for change.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 300 - Ethics, the Law and Educational Policy


    Introduction to the ethical implications and legal responsibilities of educational leaders working in a diverse society. Provides an opportunity to critically examine beliefs, values, and the influence of these on personal and professional leadership skills and policy development.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 302 - Advocacy, Justice and Leadership in a Diverse Society


    Introduction to the study and practice of effective leadership in a diverse society. Particular attention is given to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, disability and language. Introduction to theories and strategies that will prepare them to advocate and act in ways that shape and influence educational organizations and serve the interests of all members of society.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 321 - History of American Education


    Survey of American education in relation to the main currents of American history. Includes religious, political, cultural, and demographic influences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Sophomore standing.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 355 - Sociology of Schooling


    Introduction to the sociological study of schooling. Examination of the role of schools in modern society, the organizational features of schools, education as an institution and its relation to other social institutions, and the relationship between schooling and social inequality.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 400 - Foundations of Education


    Sociological, philosophical, and historical foundations of education. Curriculum development, multicultural concerns, and school organization are addressed in relation to teaching.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 410 - Philosophy of Education


    Differentiates philosophy of education from other basic inquiry into education. Emphasis on standard forms of philosophical reasoning. Exploration of leading writings for their relevance to the improvement of instruction in a sociocultural context.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 415 - Policy Analysis in Educational Contexts


    Learn and employ critical policy analysis skills to understand, analyze and critique policy formation, implementation and evaluation. Examine the relationship between policy process and the role of leaders in diverse educational contexts. Explore how leadership skills, politics, social trends and conditions, educational philosophies, and policy research can all influence policy generation and outcomes. Policy analysis is treated as both a theoretical and practical endeavor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 426X - Foundations of Psychedelic Studies in Education


    Crosslisted as EPS 426. An exploration of psychological, social, historical, philosophical, and anthropological implications of psychedelics for educational practice and policy.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 430 - Comparative and International Education


    Examines sociocultural foundations of education from comparative perspectives. Field-based evidence from Western and non-Western societies used to examine the educational goals and practices across cultures and nations.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 440 - Education for Social Justice


    Examines the social and psychological conditions that give rise to increased levels of violence, aggression, and fear within individuals and societies. Explores how “education for social justice” as a conceptual framework can be best adopted and practiced by educators and citizens to clarify the moral and educational challenges posed by these destructive psychological and cultural patterns of behavior.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPFE 486 - Internship in Educational Foundations


    Application of the principles of foundations of education in a practical setting. Instruction supervised by a foundations of education professor. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPFE 490 - Workshop in Education


    Concentrated study of curriculum, contemporary issues, and problems of the community and the public schools. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Acceptance by director of workshop.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPFE 492 - Special Topics in Foundations of Education


    Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours when topic varies.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPFE 497 - Independent Study


    Independent study under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPS 282X - Educational Participation in Clinical Experiences: Elementary Education


    Crosslisted as TLEE 282. Pre-student teaching practicum. Observation, assessment, and analysis of child development and behavior. Observation and analysis of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and classroom management in culturally/economically diverse classrooms. Design, implementation, and evaluation of lesson plans. Requires a minimum of 16 clock hours working directly with elementary grade students and teachers to apply information and skills learned in college courses to classroom settings. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of elementary education adviser. Concurrent enrollment in EPS 304 is required.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    EPS 300 - Educational Psychology


    Application of psychological principles to teaching with attention given to the learning process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: GPA of 2.00 or higher and PSYC 102.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 304 - Development of the Elementary School Child


    Psychological and social forces affecting development of children from birth through puberty. Emphasis on implications for school practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: GPA of 2.50 or higher, and sophomore standing.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 307 - Development of the Adolescent


    Intellectual, social, personality, and physical development of the adolescent. Emphasis on implications for school practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: PSYC 102.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 382 - Educational Participation in Clinical Experience: Middle Level Education


    Pre-student-teaching practicum. Observation and analysis of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and behavior management practices in multicultural middle grades classrooms (grades 5-8). Design, implementation, and evaluation of lesson plans. Requires a minimum of 16 clock hours per semester hour. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 semester hours. S/U grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department. CRQ: EPS 419.

    Credits: 1-2
  
  •  

    EPS 405 - Issues in Human Development in the Elementary Through High School Years


    Cognitive, socioemotional, and physical development of children and adolescents within their families, schools, and sociocultural contexts. Focus on relationships between these aspects of student development and their implications for educational approaches and teaching within a school setting. Designed for students needing K-12 educator licensure.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: PSYC 102, minimum GPA of 2.50, at least junior standing, and admission to an educator licensure program. CRQ: Documented clinical experience or supervised participation in schools.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 406 - Issues in Human Development and Learning in the Middle School and High School Years


    Cognitive, socioemotional, and physical characteristics of youth and their implications for educational practices with respect to student learning and performance in middle school and high school. Designed for students seeking educator licensure in grades 5-12 only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Minimum GPA of 2.50, at least junior standing, and admission to an educator licensure program. CRQ: Clinical experience or supervised participation in schools.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 419 - The Middle School Child


    Examination of the match between characteristics of early adolescents (10-14 years) and characteristics of middle school programs. Biological, cultural, psychological, and social forces affecting the development of young adolescents. Focus on the role of the teacher, school, and community in helping the adolescent to deal with the impact of changes in these types of forces.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: PSYC 102.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 426 - Foundations of Psychedelic Studies in Education


    Crosslisted as EPFE 426X. An exploration of psychological, social, historical, philosophical, and anthropological implications of psychedelics for educational practice and policy. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 430 - Becoming Adult in Postmodern Contexts


    A cross-disciplinary approach to explore the meaning(s) of adulthood and the reasons for the delay in the transition to adulthood in contemporary society utilizing psychological, sociological, historical, and anthropological approaches. Focus on identity theories, postmodern critiques of identity, and contested definitions of adulthood. Reflection on identity development and growth toward adulthood is encouraged.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: PSYC 102.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 450 - Classroom Management


    Applications of motivation and management principles and procedures to maintain a positive learning environment in classrooms.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    EPS 454 - The Gifted Student


    Characteristics of the gifted. Emphasis on identification, growth and development, creativity, motivation, guidance, and evaluation of the gifted.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EPS 490 - Workshop in Education


    Concentrated study of curriculum, contemporary issues, and problems of the community and the public schools. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Acceptance by director of workshop.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPS 492 - Special Topics in Educational Psychology


    Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours when topic varies.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    EPS 497 - Independent Study


    Independent study under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    ETR 230 - Program Evaluation in the Digital Age


    Examination of models and methods for the evaluation of technology-enhanced human learning environments (e.g., instructional technology, online training, digital media and learning objects, and technology-enhanced assessments). Survey of evaluation types, quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods (sampling, instrumentation, and data analysis), evaluation issues related to working with stakeholders and ethics, and evaluation communication and reporting. Emphasis on evaluation proposal development.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ETR 340 - Survey Methods for Training and Evaluation


    Introduction to methods used in survey implementation. Overview of the survey process including choosing a survey platform (e.g., paper, electronic); survey instrument selection and/or design; sampling techniques; and summarizing, interpreting, and communicating survey results.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 430 - Classroom Assessment in Elementary Education


    Devices and techniques available to the elementary teacher for measuring and evaluating pupil growth and learning for guiding children in realizing their individual potentials in a multicultural setting. Students taking this course are not eligible to take ETR 440.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher. Limited to elementary education majors.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 431 - Program/Performance Evaluation


    Introduction to formative and summative methods used for evaluating various programs and initiatives. Fundamentals of the evaluation process include involving stakeholders; conducting a needs assessment; developing goals and indicators; designing evaluation frameworks; collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data; and reporting evaluation findings.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 434 - Assessing Students with Special Needs


    Nondiscriminatory assessment procedures for identifying and enhancing educational outcomes for students with special needs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: SESE 240 or consent of department.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 440 - Classroom Assessment Techniques


    Purpose and methods of formal and informal classroom assessment for guiding and communicating instructional decisions. Techniques for designing, using, and evaluating curriculum-aligned assessments through traditional (e.g., paper-and-pencil, standardized and standards-based assessments) and alternative methods (e.g., performance-based, authentic assessments). Emphasis placed on practical applications and data-based decision making. Designed to be taken by majors outside the College of Education seeking K-12 or secondary initial educator licensure.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Minimum 2.50 GPA. Students taking this course are not eligible to take ETR 430.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 450 - Data Analysis for Design and Evaluation


    Introduction to the evaluation of instructional and training programs. Exploration of data collection methods and analysis approaches used to assess effectiveness of instructional and training programs, both during the instructional development process or after intended trainings are delivered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of the department.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 451 - Community-based and Participatory Action Research


    Introduction to theories and practice of Participatory Action Research (PAR) and Community-based research. Emphasis on hands-on fieldwork in a community setting to investigate a particular issue or problem.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETR 492 - Special Topics in Research and Assessment


    Topics announced. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 semester hours when topic varies.

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    ETR 497 - Independent Research in Research and Assessment


    Independent study under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Consent of department.

    Credits: 1-3
  
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    ETRA 422 - Technology and Assessment for Middle Level Education and Secondary Education


    Equips educators with skills pertaining to technology integration, assessment and evaluation of effective instruction, with a focus on theory and practice behind successful technology implementation in education. Issues such as designing instruction for the learner, fostering interactive learning, assessment process, and measuring successful implementation will be examined and discussed.

    Credits: 4
  
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    ETRA 490 - Professional Portfolio Assessment


    Introduction to instructional theory and the process of producing a prior learning assessment portfolio of learning in non-traditional settings such as workplace, community, and volunteering. Up to 30 credit hours may be awarded by a faculty committee in the emphasis area as documented in the portfolio. Must be taken in the first year.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PRQ: Bachelor of Science in Applied Management major with an emphasis on instructional technology, training and evaluation (BSAM-ITTE) and consent of the department.

    Credits: 1
  
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    ETT 211 - Technology in a Diverse Society


    Access, evaluation, and utilization of instructional and social media for various cultures and countries. Topics include appropriateness of technology for diverse audiences, analysis of technology for instructional environments, and analysis of technology for social environments.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 229 - Computers in Education


    Fundamental operations and concepts of computer technologies to facilitate learning in today’s P-12 classrooms. No previous experience with computers required. Designed for students entering the education profession. Not open to students with previous experience with data processing, information systems, without permission of their major department.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 231 - Digital Visual Literacy for Learning


    Exploration of the historical background and practice involved in digital visual literacy. Review the use and design of various digital media communications. Develop understanding of the interpretation of digital visual literacy. Create and integrate digital visual literacy into professional practice for various audiences.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 234 - Learning with Technology


    Overview of current and emerging interactive technology (hardware and software) used to support learning in various settings. Reviews the development of technology tools for learning in different settings from the past to current technologies with hands-on experience with these technologies.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 310 - Instructional Design Models, Strategies and Tactics


    Introduction to instructional design, application of instructional design models, and design of appropriate instructional strategies and tactics.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 311 - Instructional Media Literacy, Prototyping and Publication


    Introduction to principles of instructional media literacy, iterative design prototyping and publication for the purposes of developing well-designed and accessible print and digital content.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ETT 329 - Learning in the Digital Age


    Survey of emerging technologies and tools that are transforming our society and schools, as well as the implications these changes have for learning. Emphasis on the skills and knowledge students need to learn effectively and live productively in an increasingly global and digital world.

    Credits: 3
 

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